EVERYDAY

| 90 mins | 2012

EVERYDAY tells the story of four children separated from their father, and a wife separated from her husband.



Festivals & Awards

Toronto International Film Festival 2012 Official Selection Masters
Telluride Film Festival 2012 Official Selection
Dinard Film Festival 2012 Official Selection
London Film Festival 2012 Official Selection
Abu Dhabi Film Festival 2012
Stockholm Film Festival 2012
Fibresci critics' prize Open Zone Section at Stockholm FF 2012
Tallinn Black Nights Film Festival 2012



Cast & Credits

Director: Michael Winterbottom
Cast: John Simm, Shirley Henderson



Synopsis

EVERYDAY tells the story of four children separated from their father, and a wife separated from her husband.

The father Ian is in prison. The mother Karen has to bring up a family of four children by herself.

Filmed over a period of five years, EVERYDAY uses the repetitions and rhythms of everyday life to explore how a family can survive a prolonged period apart. It is, in part, a response to the usual way cinema portrays the passage of time.

The film unfolds in a series of visits: first the family visiting the father in prison, later the father visiting the family at home. With each visit the distance between the children and their father becomes harder to bridge.

By avoiding the normal cinema conventions of time passing, EVERYDAY focuses on the small subtle changes as people grow up and grow old whilst being apart.

It is a story of survival and love, a celebration of the small pleasures of everyday life.



Press & Reviews

Everday Review - The Guardian
Everyday Review - Evening Standard
Everyday Review - Screen International
Everyday Review: 'This year's best movie' - Village Voice
Michael Winterbottom's "Everyday" nabbed the Fipresci critics' prize in the Open Zone section | Variety
Michael Winterbottom's 'Everyday' is a prison drama that was worth doing time for - Independent
Michael Winterbottom's Everyday is one of the most stunning films of the year - Mirror
Michael Winterbottom's Everyday: the art of growing up in real time - The Telegraph